Friday Updates

Greetings! Sorry about the extended absence from the blog, with the exception of yesterday, of course. I thought I’d pop on for a couple of updates.

Spring is here, so no more polar vortex for the moment. Yay!

Current status: very blonde. I might update my photos. I haven’t done that in a while anyway.

Today I’m finishing the first ⅓ of season 3 of DDTS, my short fiction series that should come out sometime in the next few months.

I decided to write a whole year’s worth of content for the series before releasing any of it because I didn’t want to get distracted halfway through and derail the rhythm. I also didn’t want to get into this cycle of stressing out over a monthly deadline. This system is working great so far. Unless life interferes somehow, I should have them all out on time.

Also, I have a t-shirt design in mind, which will likely be just for me, but I’ll put them up for sale in case anyone else wants one or wants any other related merchandise. This is assuming I can pull off the design I want. I’m still learning my new software so anything could happen.

What I do know for sure is that working on this series is making me happy. It’s a bit of a slog, but I get the ideas out of my head much faster than with full novels, and I get to move on to the next thing in a matter of days or weeks as opposed to months. This way of working is very attention-deficit friendly.

Plus, I keep thinking of different ways to use the stories. Turns out that short fiction is a very portable thing. More on that later if I get around to doing what I’d like to do with it.

Audiobook progress: either 26 or 27 chapters recorded. As usual, I’m having technical difficulties. My ten-year-old laptop has all but died. It decided that it no longer wanted to acknowledge the existence of my mic, except for the sound effect that goes off when I plug it in. It will also no longer load the list of devices.

I did all the things it liked before: cleaning it off, defragging, etc. It’s just time to let it go. I knew it was coming.

I am sad, though. That’s my computer ride-or-die. On it, I’ve written books, drawn and designed, learned, conversed with internet people. Have I mentioned that I get weirdly attached to things?

So she’s off to graze in the meadow of semi-dead laptops that lives in my basement. Fare thee well, my love.

I have since commandeered my son’s abandoned HP laptop, which doesn’t seem to have the super weird sound issues that the Windows 10 Dells have.

That’s all I have for now. Catch ya later!

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Tolkien, Plato, and Gyges Walk Into a Bar But Not in that Order

You may have heard of a few little books by Tolkien: The HobbitThe Lord of the Rings, etc.

In these books, a central part of the story is THE ring. You know, the one to rule them all? Well, guess what. Tolkien was not the first to write about an invisibility ring.

Let us back up several steps to Herodotus’ Histories and the story of Candaules, his wife and Gyges. This version of the Gyges story goes like this: King Candaules keeps bugging his bodyguard Gyges about how hot his wife is. Candaules is like hey, hide in this room and watch her take her clothes off if you don’t believe me. Gyges does it. Wife catches him. Wife says you have 2 choices. You can die now or kill my skeevy husband, marry me, and usurp the throne. Gyges chooses the latter.

No ring, I know. Just wait for it.

In Plato’s Republic, he takes elements of that story but puts his own spin on it. Here’s a bit from Wikipedia:

“It told of a man named Gyges who lived in Lydia, an area in modern Turkey. He was a gygesshepherd for the king of that land. One day, there was an earthquake while Gyges was out in the fields, and he noticed that a new cave had opened up in a rock face. When he went in to see what was there, he noticed a gold ring on the finger of a former giant king who had been buried in the cave, in an iron horse with a window in its side. He took the ring away with him and soon discovered that it allowed the wearer to become invisible. The next time he went to the palace to give the king a report about his sheep, he put the ring on, seduced the queen, killed the king, and took control of the palace.”

Allowed the wearer to become invisible. Sound familiar?

So we have Herodotus influencing Plato possibly influencing Tolkien. The legend might even go back further than that.

What does it all mean?

That Tolkien likely read Plato, and that a great many writers, even the best ones, take inspiration where they can get it. Kind of makes me curious about what else Hero and Plato were serving up.

Linkies

https://www.livius.org/sources/content/herodotus/candaules-his-wife-and-gyges/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyges_of_Lydia